Bleeding Hearts?

Bleeding Hearts are one of my favourite plants.

I remember, when I was a little girl, my aunt had them all around the front porch of her log house. They were spectacular. A profusion of pink for two weeks or so and then they would die off until the next year. Bleeding hearts make me reminisce about a period of my life that I loved.

Richard and I have some planted down the side of the house.  I love photographing these little heart shaped flowers. I wonder why they are called ‘Bleeding’ Hearts?

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2 thoughts on “Bleeding Hearts?

  1. Наташа & Katya, now I am really cfseunod about the language to use when talking to both of you. A nice discussion! I am glad Katya raised one issue I was going to raise too, viz. “where did all these girls who were great at mathematics in school [and let me add, in their undergrad and graduate studies] disappear to?” Well, I am not sure I am totally convinced by Natasha’s reply to this. Here at MSRI they worry about this issue, and here is the statistics that bothers them: among math Ph.D’s in the US, women constitute about 30%. At the same time, the fraction of female applicants to practically every program at MSRI is about 10%. Why is this happening? There is probably a combination of several factors at play here, and actually I am not even sure this is such a bad thing. After all, pure math is not a prestigious subject in this country, it is not very well paid (although I am not complaining 🙂 ), it can be quite frustrating at times, etc. Maybe women are just too smart and too practical to go there (this is definitely my explanation of why women are not as good in chess as men).But MSRI does not see things this way, so does everything possible to stretch 10% of female applicants into as close as possible to 30% of participants. Frankly sometimes it’s not pretty.Returning to the issue of “connections for women” meetings, let me also reiterate that an absolute majority of young female participants are enthusiastically supporting this idea and insisting on continuing this tradition. In this country you don’t ignore things like this. To summarize my attitude, I find Natasha’s negative view a little oversimplified. I think it is a complicated issue, and I don’t have a clear-cut answer in my head.

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